Tag Archives: Publication

Publications!

I have been very slack again on the blog front. I mean it’s one thing to not be writing new stories, but to not post when I get something published, well things must be bad. So, I’m going to address that now!

Pizzas, Parties and Poltergeists

Released in March (see, I’ve been very slack), this anthology is quite a hoot. It’s a collection of ten 80s-set or inspired horror stories from around the world. The 80s were never very good at taking themselves too seriously, and that’s reflected in a lot of the stories in the collection. But there are a few of the creepier type that the 80s did so well.

My story, Betamax, took inspiration from the classic teen horror movies of the era and writing it took me back to the fuzzed fringe and blue-mascara days. I just hope the Americans could work out that a fringe was bangs, and that they weren’t too offended that a scene took place in a toilet instead of a bathroom. 😊

The Mouse

The next publication doesn’t actually happen until next month, so the link above takes you to the Antipodean SF home page where you can see my name in the ‘Next Issue’ section for now. But go through and read some cool flash fiction from some great talent this month before it rolls over.

The Mouse is actually one of my #FuriousFiction stories with the mandatory words removed. I’ve written it 100% in speech, no description, no speech tags, nothing. That’s one of the reasons I was so keen to see Antipodean SF take it up, because Ion, the editor, selects a few to read on his radio show, and I’m hoping this one will get in.

So that’s it for now. I’ve got nothing in the pipeline, but a lot of new ideas, so let’s hope I can get at least one more of my babies out into the world before the end of 2021.

2021

I won’t lie, it’s been a rubbish year for my writing so far. Not as much about publications or rejections, but more about how many words I’ve actually written. Basically, if it wasn’t for Furious Fiction each month, I wouldn’t have written a single word.

I know it’s been far too long since I wrote on a regular basis because my typing skills are starting to slide. I type each day for work, and I’ve noticed a lot more errors than usual. I think it’s because I’m not giving my typing brain the workout it is used to.

There is only one cure for this, and that’s to make myself write. I’ve done it in the past and I’m sure I can do it again. I might lay off the experimental stuff to start with, because that’s what sent me down the rejection gurgler last year, and bruised my authorial ego more than I realised. So it is back to my bread and butter; horror, science fiction and a little bit of fantasy. No more crime or magical realism. Clearly, I can’t do it as well as I think I can. For now I’ll keep that stuff just for me.

In the meantime, I’ve re-jigged my website so it works better on different devices (and stops my host from closing down my aged old site). I’ve also just had one of my flash fiction pieces appear on the Antipodean SF radio show. So, please check them out.

The past 12 months have been tough for everyone. I really hope that we are all on the road back to recovery. And I hope to be able to share more good news about my productivity (and possibly publications) soon.

Take care.

Nat

Publications!

After working so hard all year to get my short stories out, I suddenly have two Flash Fiction stories published in the same month.

Clutch
This story was inspired by a documentary narrated by David Attenborough. I can’t say too much, because it will be a spoiler, but suffice it to say that it wasn’t a documentary about the end of the world.

The Great Slowdown
This story was dragged out of my head for a time travel anthology. Well, I actually came up with a different flash fiction time travel story, which I worked on for ages, but then I decided that it would be better as a longer story, so I ditched it and at the last minute came up with ‘The Great Slowdown’ instead. It wasn’t selected for the anthology, but I was still happy with it, so sent it off and it was picked up straight away.

Hope you enjoy these. I have a much longer piece coming out, which I’m SUPER excited about. But until I have the publication date I won’t mention anything. I probably need to sign the contract first as well.

Publication!

Antipodean SF is celebrating its 250th issue, which represents 21 years of publishing. This is an amazing achievement in the small press world, and is a great testament to the passion of Ion ‘Nuke’ Newcombe for speculative fiction from the Antipodes.

My very first publication was in Antipodean SF, and I remember being so excited when I got that first ever acceptance. My story required a lot more editorial work than my work these days, and I will never forget how grateful I was for Ion taking the time to work with me on this.

The story I have in this edition of the ‘zine, Ti Amo, was one of several robot stories inspired by watching too many SBS documentaries late last year. I lamented the end of relationships when I considered a future where you could custom-order a partner with the personality, appearance and disposition you wanted.

Then I remembered that people are far from perfect and rarely know what we really want. Ti Amo is my glimpse into that future.

I hope you enjoy it, but I must warn you that it is a little bit saucy – so perhaps MA 15+ readers only.

Publication!

This one slipped past me because I wasn’t expecting it until 2019. It was published last Sunday, but I didn’t check my email soon enough. This story, Bleed, is quite dear to me. It has a very personal meaning and was inspired by something in my life. Anyone who has read the story will be a bit confused by that, I’m sure, because the story is set in a time and place that is clearly not our earth.

It is a horror story, but only insomuch as there is a bit of gore, and bad things happen to people. It actually feels a bit more magical realism to me, but there’s not quite enough ‘real’ to truly fit into that category.

I’m not going to tell you the meaning behind it because, firstly, it is a stand-alone story and the meaning is not required to enjoy the story, and secondly, because this twice got rejected, once with the comment ‘this is good, and it will get published, but unfortunately not with us’ – and I wonder if it was because I told them what inspired it, and maybe it hit a little too close to home? The third time I subbed it I left the inspiration story off and it got accepted, so I think there is a lesson in that.

It’s published in Midnight Echo Issue 13 (which I was desperate to get into) which is the magazine of the Australian Horror Writers Association – of which I am a member. It includes some other great fiction, so you would do well to get yourself a copy.

I hope you enjoy Bleed, and if I see you face to face, I’ll tell you the story behind it.

Acceptance!

The table of contents has been released, so I can finally let you know that my story ‘Bleed’ will be published in the upcoming edition of Midnight Echo magazine (the magazine of the Australasian Horror Writers Association). I am so excited by this because I desperately wanted to be in edition #13.

Bleed has a special place for me, because it is one of the few allegories I’ve written. It was inspired by a previous workplace where my boss sent an email at about 4pm on Sunday afternoon to get my team’s opinion on something unimportant. By the time I got into work at 7:30am on Monday everyone else had responded. I realised this was the way people lived now, and I didn’t like it. I believe that my time is my time, but then again, my time is also writing time, so maybe I’m more protective of it than most?

The whole team has been made redundant now, so the crazy hours and rapid response did little to save any of us. I’ll have to send them all a copy when the story comes out.

Another bit of exciting news, which I stumbled across by chance, is that my story ‘Glide’ published by Dimension 6 issue #10, was given an honourable mention in Ellen Datlow’s best horror stories of 2017. I’m actually chuffed that she’d read it, let alone give it an honourable mention.

So, this week has been a good week. I’ve had a few quiet pinch-myself moments which have been absolutely wonderful.

Chopstick wisdom

The other day I was washing some chopsticks in the sink, and while rinsing them I accidentally dropped them down the drain. I think if I had been trying to do it I wouldn’t have managed to get them lined up so perfectly. When I realised to where they had magically disappeared, I couldn’t help but laugh.

But this left the dilemma of how to get them out. I knew that if worse came to worse I could unscrew the pipes and pull them out, but it would be messy and require probably more strength than I have. So I got creative. I grabbed another chopstick and globbed on a nicely worked (and therefore warm and sticky) piece of blu-tack.

It only took three attempts to get the first chopstick out, but the second one proved far more difficult. I brought out the hairdryer in an effort to dry the down-the-drain chopstick so it would be more likely to stick, but even this had only limited success. The chopstick would come part way up, but as soon as I started to pull the blu-tack through the drain opening the stick would drop like a stone.

It was a bit frustrating and I wanted to give up, but I realised there was a good lesson in life here. I could give up and live with a chopstick in my drain, catching all the goop, and no doubt eventually blocking the drain, or I could persist and maybe succeed. I did persist and only two more attempts later I managed to snag the chopstick and pull it out.

The thing is, you never know which time you will pull the chopstick up and it will hold long enough for you to get it out. The only thing you can be sure of is that if you stop trying to pull it out, it will stay there. If I keep sending out my writing, it will get picked up some time. If it stays on my computer and never sees the light of day, it will never get out into the big wide world.

So, I’ll keep sending out my stories. I’ve pulled out a few chopsticks before, so I’m confident I can do it again if I just keep trying.

Publication!

I have to warn you, this story contains the F-word. Yes, there are farts in it. I was brought up properly, where a lady does not fart (unless asleep, but even then we deny it)… but that got me thinking about when else a lady might fart. And so A Reluctant Zombie was born.

I’ve been warned against publishing this story as it has a bit of a pull my finger quality that is perhaps not becoming of my writing career. I actually sat on it for nearly two years before finally deciding to send it out. There is no deeper meaning and no call to arms to make a difference in the world. It is just a silly story, written by a silly girl in a silly mood. Sometimes I can do that.

The other difference with this story to my usual offerings is that it is unashamedly biographical. The girl starts out watching my TV on my lounge, she lives with my cat, goes to my old office, and shocks my old boss. You could say it was me except for the lack of vegetables, and of course the farting. My mum brought me up right, remember.

So please, if you are going to read it, say no to the plastic bag at the supermarket, take your keep-cup to the coffee shop, and please turn off your standby power equipment at the wall. My story won’t tell you to do that, so it will make me feel better if you do.

I hope you enjoy A Reluctant Zombie, but please, put on your silly hat first. And no, I will not pull your finger.

Publication! – Sea Canaries

This is a flash fiction story which I wrote immediately after completing my novella earlier this year. It felt weird not sitting down to write after work each evening, but I knew I wasn’t ready to jump into a novel yet. Sea Canaries was my answer to winding down the writing spring of creativity that was still coiled too tightly.

As soon as I read the call for submissions this story appeared in my head. I wrote the first draft in one sitting (as one would expect of an under 500 word piece) but I edited it over a period of two weeks before I was happy with it. My main issue was that the version of the story I first wrote was about 615 words long, and I had to get it under 500. I was very attached to the excess 115 words.

Without giving too much away, the submission called for horrors of the deep. I wanted to write a story where the horror was coming from the deep, but the monsters were much closer to home. Later this year I’ll publish the full 615 word version on my website so you can read it as I first experienced it. I’m proud of this story and really enjoyed walking around in these skins for a fortnight, as much as I never want to live it for real.

Sea Canaries appears in the Anemone Enemy and is available in both print and ebook formats. I hope you enjoy reading my story as much as I enjoyed writing it!

AnemoneEnemyCover

Why YA novels?

Just in case you missed it, I had another PUBLICATION this week! It is an eco-horror tale and, as with most of my short fiction, it is aimed at an adult audience. Yet I have four completed novels and three of them are young adult. The next two that I’m planning are also YA – so why the different audience?

Nearly ten years ago, when I really first started writing seriously, I noticed a change in published speculative fiction. It started to get dark. Where previously a murder was mentioned or glossed over, the books now seemed to go into a lot of graphic detail. This was the same for intimacy scenes. Where once the door was closed, now it was open… wide open.

I know I might cop a lot of criticism over this, but I don’t like to write that. I don’t judge you if you like to read it, I just don’t want to. I know some of my stories, particularly the horror tales, get gory sometimes, but I like to think they never get gratuitous. I show as much as you need to get the picture. This idea doesn’t seem to sell adult books.

Young adult novels are exactly what the name suggests; aimed at young adults. This means I can write adult themes, deal with mature concepts, and (even better for me) I can mash-up genres BUT I can also get away with toning down the graphic bits. I’m not saying all YA novels are soft, there are a lot of very dark, very graphic YA stories, but publishers don’t demand it of you as a writer.

So I am happy to spend 60 or 70,000 words exploring my speculative theme with slightly younger protagonists than my short stories. I don’t feel like my wings are clipped at all. If anything I feel like I am able to take my writing wherever I want to go with a YA audience.

It was YA that first made me realise that novels could be just as entertaining as movies. I remember reading Lois Duncan for the first time and thinking to myself ‘this is what I want to do with the rest of my life.’ It’s been a while since then, but I’m finally fulfilling that wish.