Bald Baby Crow

Family of Criws

In early October I started getting a visitor in my garden; a bald baby crow. Still hurting from the loss of the Gardner, I didn’t want to get too close. But with his daily visits, and watching him grow, I couldn’t help but be drawn in. I noticed that other baby crows in the area looked normal, so why was this crow bald?

When I Googled ‘bald baby crow’ I got nothing besides a UK site which suggested my crow had mites and was likely to die. Given that Adelaide crows are not actually crows, but ravens, and they are nothing like the evil-sounding birds I’ve seen in the northern hemisphere, I decided to ignore their I predictions of doom.

His parents didn’t seem fussed and he seemed to be thriving in all other ways, so I decided to document his growth. Below, for anyone else who has a bald baby crow in their backyard, I want to give you hope that your bald baby crow can grow into a healthy, feathered crow (or raven):

Bald Baby Crow Week 1
Bald Baby Crow Week 1

First photo – sorry, this was taken on my phone, so not terribly close or clear. When he first arrived his legs were naked as well. By the time I got this picture he had feathers on his legs and a dark patch on the top of his head.

Bald Baby Crow Week 2
Bald Baby Crow Week 2

Now I’ve got the SLR out, so you can see him a bit better. The dark patch on his head has definitely turned into feathers.

Bald Baby Crow Week 2 later
Bald Baby Crow Week 2.5

SLR + Zoom. The feathers are growing, but his ears are still very exposed.

Bald Baby Crow
Bald Baby Crow week 5 (left side)

Above and below – left and right side; his ears are now covered and just a small patch of feathers coming in on his throat hint that anything was ever not normal

Bald Baby Crow Week 5 (right side)
Bald Baby Crow Week 5 (right side)

So now the little bald baby crow is not bald, not a baby and apparently not even a crow. He’s now a fine-feathered raven.

Who are you calling a crow?
Who are you calling a crow?

2 thoughts on “Bald Baby Crow”

  1. Today is August 28, 2020. I am in Rochester Washington. Just last week I noticed a strange looking bird in my backyard. It was hopping around the ground with another Crow. I soon realized this must be its baby. But it looked much more like a tiny vulture. It is bald, has a bare belly and legs. It’s wings and back are fully feathered. I filmed it on my cell phone hopping around and squawking at its parents while they fed him and showed him the ways to scavenge. It would hop up and attempt to drink water out of a container we left outside for them. Its parents would take drinks and jump inside to show it how to take a bath. It simply just squawked at them. I wondered if it might be ill. But now I am hopeful its feathers will come in. I will continue to look for him and film him when I can.

  2. That sounds just like my experience with bald baby crow. I have to admit, in Australia they are actually ravens (for some reason we have always called them crows, even naming our football team after them, but we don’t have any crows, just ravens). I haven’t seen the issue on any of the other baby ravens since, but I’m sure it is just a delayed-development thing. And my ‘crow’ has since grown up and looks like all the other crows (ravens).

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