Category Archives: Photos

Bald Baby Crow

Family of Criws

In early October I started getting a visitor in my garden; a bald baby crow. Still hurting from the loss of the Gardner, I didn’t want to get too close. But with his daily visits, and watching him grow, I couldn’t help but be drawn in. I noticed that other baby crows in the area looked normal, so why was this crow bald?

When I Googled ‘bald baby crow’ I got nothing besides a UK site which suggested my crow had mites and was likely to die. Given that Adelaide crows are not actually crows, but ravens, and they are nothing like the evil-sounding birds I’ve seen in the northern hemisphere, I decided to ignore their I predictions of doom.

His parents didn’t seem fussed and he seemed to be thriving in all other ways, so I decided to document his growth. Below, for anyone else who has a bald baby crow in their backyard, I want to give you hope that your bald baby crow can grow into a healthy, feathered crow (or raven):

Bald Baby Crow Week 1
Bald Baby Crow Week 1

First photo – sorry, this was taken on my phone, so not terribly close or clear. When he first arrived his legs were naked as well. By the time I got this picture he had feathers on his legs and a dark patch on the top of his head.

Bald Baby Crow Week 2
Bald Baby Crow Week 2

Now I’ve got the SLR out, so you can see him a bit better. The dark patch on his head has definitely turned into feathers.

Bald Baby Crow Week 2 later
Bald Baby Crow Week 2.5

SLR + Zoom. The feathers are growing, but his ears are still very exposed.

Bald Baby Crow
Bald Baby Crow week 5 (left side)

Above and below – left and right side; his ears are now covered and just a small patch of feathers coming in on his throat hint that anything was ever not normal

Bald Baby Crow Week 5 (right side)
Bald Baby Crow Week 5 (right side)

So now the little bald baby crow is not bald, not a baby and apparently not even a crow. He’s now a fine-feathered raven.

Who are you calling a crow?
Who are you calling a crow?

Understanding future you

With the New Year on the horizon a lot of us will be setting (or meticulously honing) our goals for the next year. As an avid goal setter, I would like to share one piece of advice for when you are setting your ‘achievable’ goals and that is make sure you understand future you.

Time and time again when I set my goals I seem to believe that future me will be somehow more motivated, dedicated and un-distractible than current me. For example; my list for what I wanted to achieve with my week off between Christmas and New Year gave me three tasks to complete on Boxing day, one of which was ‘paint deck’. By the time I had scrubbed the deck, and painted just the outside fence part it was 7pm and I was exhausted.

Current me stupidly took time off for meal breaks, phone calls and sun exposure which future me apparently would have worked through. Current me also only works at a human pace, while future me gets no muscle aches, hand cramps or frustration at having to save so many bugs.

The point is, you should factor in a lot of contingency in your plan. I’m already looking at my list of what I want to achieve in January and it is looking very full. At the same time I know that I have an event on every weekend, not to mention visitors to catch up with, so the *future me* alarm is starting to ring.

So if you suffer from a bit of future me, my advice is take your list and halve it. It will always feel much better to achieve MORE than you set for yourself rather than less. I’m going to take my own advice and put the red pen to my current list, and hopefully I’ll get the deck finished before I go back to work.

It’s not all about the vegetables

Yes, another glorious spring weekend, another full green bin and another couple of days where the garden won out over the computer.

But just in case you thought I was only concerned about getting my zucchini, pumpkin, silverbeet and tomatoes in on time, I thought I’d prove that there is more to my garden than edibles.

Snapdragon flower white
White Snapdragon

 

Flowers to keep bad bugs away
Marigolds

   

Lovely flowers
Flowers that start with 'r' - I was never very good at botany
Hopefully I’ll be able to show you some vegetables next month. Gotta love spring!