Top 10 writer things to do – Visualisation

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Okay, I’m not going to go all ‘the secret’ on you, but visualisation is a powerful tool. I’m a qualified hypnotherapist (scary huh?) and almost all of what hypnosis is about is visualisation. The difference is that when under hypnosis you can bypass your RAS (let’s just say conscious mind, look it up if you are interested) and work on your unconscious mind. If that sounds a bit too fluffy for you, then cut out the expert, and work directly with your conscious mind with a bit of visualisation. It takes a bit longer, but can still get you there in the end.

For you scientists out there, who don’t believe in destiny, think of it this way; every day you make decisions that take you in the direction in which you expect to go. Regular visualisation primes your mind to expect to go toward whatever you are visualising. If you don’t visualise, your mind doesn’t really have a goal so it will opt for the decision that keeps the status quo. Fine if you want to keep working in that day job.

Writers, perhaps more than any others, are perfectly placed to make visualisation work, because we are always imagining our stories, so are very comfortable in the imagined world. The problem is that writers also tend to be a bit bad at positive self-talk. I have my own theories on why, but that is best shared face to face over a glass of wine. I know that personally, I’m shocking at making time for visualisation. Even when I add it to my weekly list of things to do, it is inevitably forced out late on Sunday night just so I can cross it off the list. Not an ideal way of going about it.

The key to visualising well is to have a specific event to watch; walking up to receive an award for your published book, a book signing with a line of people going out the door, a room full of people attending a reading that you are doing. Got it? Be specific and be as detailed as possible. Don’t just hold a copy of your book in your hand and know that it has sold well. But be sure to see your book in your visualisation. You have to know what your aim is; success can come from many things, so we want to tie this to your novel.

The next major thing is not just to imagine the scenario, but let yourself feel the emotions of that scenario. Feel the excitement that so many people love your book, feel the relief that you no longer have to go to the day job (hmmm, a bit of a recurring theme for me), revel in the joy of someone else knowing your characters as intimately as you do. When you feel those emotions in the visualisation you feel it in real life too, and your body will want more.

The final key to good visualisation is to do it regularly. Hurriedly imagining you goal on a Sunday night once a month isn’t going to cut it. I would even say once a day is not too often. To this end, I might take my own advice and make it part of my nightly routine, just like brushing my teeth. Let’s see if it helps?

Now I won’t promise that this will get you published, but it might help you to overcome the sloth you feel at the end of long, hard day at work, so that instead of sitting in front of the TV you write. After all, it is getting the words on the page that will eventually get you published, so anything that helps with that has got to be good.

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